Tag:

Tipping

  • In The Maldives, a 10% service charge is normally added to your purchases in a resort, so tipping on top of that is not necessary. If you really want to show your appreciation for great service of course, it will be gratefully received. Here’s our guidelines on appropriate amounts to tip in The Maldives.

  • Tipping is fairly common practice in tourist hotspots in Indonesia, particularly Bali. Base salaries are often quite low so any tokens of appreciation for service will be gratefully received. You’ll notice tipping is not common amongst local people and is very much an import from western culture. If you feel though people should be rewarded for good service, it’s a nice token of appreciation.

  • Cambodia

    Tipping in Cambodia

    March 20, 2017

    Tipping is very much a western import and some guides may say it’s not customary. That being said it’s an important form of secondary income for Cambodians and does incentive good service. Here, we share on our thoughts on what is an appropriate amount to tip.

  • Tipping in Vietnam is very much a western import. In certain places however, it’s becoming an important supplementary form of income. You might find a difference between the North and South of the country: Saigon’s exposure to US culture has made tipping more of a thing although, to be honest, exposure to the tourist industry has meant the practice is now countrywide. Although tips are not expected, they are very much appreciated but it can sometimes be challenging working out how much to tip and when it’s appropriate to do so. Here we provide an insider’s guide:

  • Having only opened up to tourists relatively recently, there’s a nascent culture of tipping in Myanmar. We’d encourage tipping for particularly good service; wages are low so they’ll certainly be appreciated. That being said, do only tip on a merit basis and don’t feel obliged to do it. Here are our guidelines for tipping in Myanmar.

  • It is customary to tip in India. Staff will happily to accept and appreciate it. Small tips (anything between 20 and 100 rupees) for small services, such as looking after shoes, carrying bags etc… are appreciated and bar staff also expect small tips. However, please do not feel obliged to tip every time, or to give more than a small note.

  • There is a strong tipping culture in Sri Lanka; wages are low so it’s an important additional way of making money. Of course, tips should be earned for good service rather than simply expected. Here are our guidelines for good tipping practise.